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History

Break’n News History Page. As an aggregate, blog and our own news, Break’n News presents information in photos, videos, and written.

History

How the Smithsonian Is Documenting the Work of Immigrant Rights Activists | At the Smithsonian

Smithsonian
On November 12, 2019, curators from the National Museum of American History assembled at the U.S. Supreme Court as observers, and collectors, of history. That day, the justices heard three cases pertaining to the status of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Positioned both inside the courtroom and......
History

When the Greenbrier and Other Appalachian Resorts Became Prisons for Axis Diplomats | Travel

Smithsonian
In the 1930s, as the drumbeats of war in Europe and the Far East grew louder, Americans maintained their workaday lives and strived for business as usual—as did their employers. “At a traditionally famous hotel, the Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia,” read one ad in the April 1938......
History

The History of the Hard Hat | Innovation

Smithsonian
During World War I, death occurred on an apocalyptic scale in the killing fields of Europe. The advent of continuous-fire machine guns and modern artillery with high-explosive shells obliterated millions of lives in an era of bloody trench warfare. One saving grace was the helmet. Countless soldiers were able to......
History

Angkor Wat Owes Its Existence to Catastrophe | History

Smithsonian
The empire controlled much of mainland Southeast Asia by the beginning of the 10th century A.D., but unclear rules of succession combined with a complicated web of royal family intermarriages led to a crisis. Jayavarman IV, a grandson of a previous king, contested the rule of the leaders in Angkor,......
History

Smithsonian Curators Help Rescue the Truth From These Popular Myths | At the Smithsonian

Smithsonian
Hollywood can’t resist depicting Dolley Madison saving a portrait of George Washington from the British army. Museum visitors love to gobble up the sticky confection known as astronaut ice cream, and Plymouth Rock has become a symbol of the national narrative, but like everything else, it’s complicated. Like a game......
History

As Popular in Her Day as J.K. Rowling, Gene Stratton-Porter Wrote to the Masses About America’s Fading Natural Beauty | Science

Smithsonian
My dear Girl:In the first place will you allow me to suggest that you forgethereafter to tack the “ess” on to “author”, because one who writesa book or poem is an author and literature has no sex.–Gene Stratton-Porter, letter to Miss Mabel Anderson, March 9, 1923 * * *​ Yellow......
History

Madam C.J. Walker Gets a Netflix Close-Up | History

Smithsonian
Madam C.J. Walker, born Sarah Breedlove in Louisiana in 1867, was the most successful black wellness mogul of her day. Now a new Netflix series will show how this enterprising daughter of freed slaves empowered generations of black women to prosper. Breedlove was in her 30s when she began treating......
History

Library Treasures Featured in “Fearless: A Tribute to Irish American Women”

Library Of Congress
The following guest post was written by Barbara Bair, curator of literature, culture and the arts in the Library’s Manuscript Division; Suzanne Schadl, chief of the Hispanic Division; Dani Thurber, reference librarian in the Hispanic Division; Melanie Zeck, reference librarian in the American Folklife Center; and John Fenn, head of research and......
History

Recently Digitized Iwo Jima Footage Shows the Human Side of the Famous Battle | History

Smithsonian
When most Americans think of the World War II battle for Iwo Jima—if they think of it at all, 75 years later—they think of one image: Marines raising the U.S. flag atop Mount Suribachi, the island’s highest point. That moment, captured in black and white by Associated Press photographer Joe......
History

Recognition of Major Osage Leader and Warrior Opens a New Window Into History | At the Smithsonian

Smithsonian
In 1904, the priest of the Gentle Sky clan, Shonke Mon-thi^, came to Washington, D.C. as a member of an Osage delegation to negotiate the land and mineral rights of his nation. While in this city of diplomatic exchanges, the clan leader received an invitation from the Smithsonian Institution’s U.S.......
History

Madame Yale Made a Fortune With the 19th Century’s Version of Goop | History

Smithsonian
On an April afternoon in 1897, thousands of women packed the Boston Theatre to see the nation’s most beguiling female entrepreneur, a 45-year-old former homemaker whose talent for personal branding would rival that of any Instagram celebrity today. She called herself Madame Yale. Over the course of several hours and......
History

How the U.S. Government Deployed Grandma Moses Overseas in the Cold War | At the Smithsonian

Smithsonian
For someone who didn’t get serious about painting until her 70s, Anna Mary Robertson Moses managed a singular artistic career. She made her debut in New York City’s highly competitive art scene at the age of 80 with a 1940 gallery exhibition, “What a Farmwife Painted.” Later that year she......
History

Why the Experimental Nazi Aircraft Known as the Horten Never Took Off | At the Smithsonian

Smithsonian
In the years after World War I, when aviation was all the rage in Europe and North America but the Treaty of Versailles banned the production of military aircraft in Germany, glider clubs sprang up across the country. The brothers Walter and Reimar Horten, just 13 and 10 years old,......
History

Florence Nightingale: Reimagining the Famous Nurse | History

Smithsonian
She’s the “avenging angel,” the “ministering angel,” the “lady with the lamp”—the brave woman whose name would become synonymous with selflessness and compassion. Yet as Britain prepares to celebrate Florence Nightingale’s 200th birthday on May 12—with a wreath-laying at Waterloo Place, a special version of the annual Procession of the......
History

How Baseball’s Negro Leagues Defied the Stereotypes of Segregation | History

Smithsonian
During the half century that baseball was divided by a color line, black America created a sporting world of its own. Black teams played on city sandlots and country fields, with the best barnstorming their way across the country and throughout the Caribbean. A century ago, on February 13, 1920,......
History

Grammy Nod to Folkways’ Pete Seeger Collection Is a Fitting Tribute | At the Smithsonian

Smithsonian
From the late 1930s until his death in 2014, Pete Seeger’s songs calling for fair wages, social justice, a clean environment and world peace have remained relevant. And it is perhaps a fitting tribute that Seeger, a man for all ages, is the subject of a Smithsonian Folkways box set......
History

Charles Darwin’s Publisher Didn’t Believe in Evolution, but Sold His Revolutionary Book Anyway | Science

Smithsonian
Charles Darwin’s ideas about evolution shook up Britain’s Victorian establishment upon the release of On the Origin of Species, the 1859 bestseller that made Darwin a household name and changed the course of scientific history. Far less famous, however, is Darwin’s publisher, John Murray III. Though he ushered Darwin and......

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