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August 2, 2021

History

Break’n News History Page. As an aggregate, blog and our own news, Break’n News presents information in photos, videos, and written.

The P-51 Mustang Was the Quintessential Aircraft of the World War II Era

Smithsonian
SMITHSONIANMAG.COM | Aug. 2, 2021, 6 a.m. From a Luftwaffe base in Lyke, East Prussia, on August 6, 1944 , the German pilot Günther Schack scrambled his pursuit squadron of nine Me 109s. They headed out looking for a large number of “furniture vans,” German slang for the Soviets’ four-engine......

The Incredible Story of Lesbian Activists Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon

Smithsonian
SMITHSONIANMAG.COM | July 30, 2021, 7:22 a.m. In 2008, after 55 years together, Del Martin, age 87, and Phyllis Lyon, age 84, were finally wed in San Francisco, but it was for the second time. Four years earlier, before same-sex marriage was legalized in the state of California, during a......

Mastering Crosswords and 19 Other Smithsonian Associates Programs Streaming in August

Smithsonian
Smithsonian Voices Smithsonian Associates Mastering Crosswords and 19 Other Smithsonian Associates Programs Streaming in August July 23rd, 2021, 1:26PM / BY Lauren Lyons Professional puzzler Stanley Newman leads a Smithsonian Associates Streaming seminar “Mastering Crossword Puzzles” on August 21. (Howard Schnapp) Smithsonian Associates Streaming continues through August with individual programs,......

The Property Contract that Sheds New Light on James Smithson’s Gift to the Smithsonian

Smithsonian
Smithsonian Voices Smithsonian Libraries and Archives The Property Contract that Sheds New Light on James Smithson’s Gift to the Smithsonian July 28th, 2021, 4:02PM / BY Martha Ball The first page of the Hungerford Deed, 1787, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Acc. 19-150. (Smithsonian Institution Archives) When the Smithsonian Institution was founded......

How Wheaties Became the ‘Breakfast of Champions’

Smithsonian
SMITHSONIANMAG.COM | July 26, 2021, 10:10 a.m. In 1956, Bob Richards of the United States accomplished something no other male Olympian had ever done before or since: he won a second gold medal in the pole vault. Two years later, Richards had another first: he was featured on the front......

A History of Gymnastics, From Ancient Greece to Tokyo 2020

Smithsonian
SMITHSONIANMAG.COM | July 26, 2021, 7 a.m. Two months before the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, Simone Biles—the reigning women’s gymnastics all-around champion—made history by becoming the first woman to successfully perform a Yurchenko double pike in competition. A move “considered so perilous and challenging that no other woman has attempted it......

This Graphic Artist’s Olympic Pictograms Changed Urban Design Forever

Smithsonian
As the Olympic Games begin in Tokyo, participants face a familiar challenge. Athletes, officials and staff arriving from all over the world need to be able to find their way around without a common language. For decades, one solution to this problem has been pictograms, a spare visual language capable......

The History of the World’s First Cruise Ship Built Solely for Luxurious Travel

Smithsonian
Shipping magnate Albert Ballin had a vision. He saw a future of leisurely sea travel available to anyone willing to pay the price of a ticket. The late-19th century director of the Hamburg-Amerikanische Packetfahrt-Actien-Gesellschaft (HAPAG), or Hamburg-America Line, knew the future of the company rested beyond shipping cargo across the......

When Claims of ‘Discoveries’ in the Amazon Ring False

Smithsonian
In the Colombian Amazon rainforest tucked in towering table-top mountains known as Tepuis, thousands of pictographs can be found in large-scale murals. The paintings are located in Guaviare, a southeastern region of Colombia where the Amazon rainforest meets the plains of Colombia and Venezuela. Two locations there have confirmed rock......

For 60 Years, Indigenous Alaskans Have Hosted Their Own Olympics

Smithsonian
Every summer, Fairbanks, Alaska, plays host to one of the most important cultural events for Alaska Natives, the World Eskimo-Indian Olympics. Since 1961, the four-day event has been drawing athletes with Native heritage from the farthest reaches of the state and internationally to compete in a wide range of competitions,......

Olympian Babe Didrikson Cleared the Same Hurdles Women Athletes Face Today

Smithsonian
Women athletes have always had to clear high bars in order to be taken seriously. In the 1932 Olympic Games at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, Babe Didrikson’s bar was set at 5’5-and-a-quarter inches. That was what she would need to clear in her competition against fellow American athlete Jean......

What the Medieval Olympics Looked Like

Smithsonian
Postponed from last summer because of the global pandemic, the Olympics, beset by controversy for months now, will march on (for now) and open in Tokyo on July 23 (perhaps, however, without fans in attendance). The Games feel woven into the fabric of modern history, offering signposts that fix memory......

The ‘Protest’ Olympics That Never Came to Be

Smithsonian
In the very hot summer of 1936, a team of American Olympians crossed the Atlantic by ship, reaching Scotland on July 13. From there, they traveled to Paris, where they boarded another train, finally arriving at their destination a few days before the games were scheduled to start. They explored......

Literary Treasures: Robert Hayden Reading His Poems, Oct. 5, 1976

Library Of Congress
The following is a guest post by Wes Matthews, a summer intern in Literary Initiatives. This post is part of our “Literary Treasures” series, which highlights audio and video recordings drawn from the Library’s extensive online collections, including the Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature. By showcasing the works and......

Fifty Years Ago, Berkeley Restaurant Chez Panisse Launched the Farm-to-Table Movement

Smithsonian
When a small restaurant called Chez Panisse opened its doors 50 years ago in Berkeley, California, it wasn’t obvious that it would change how Americans thought about eating. The first menu on Aug. 28, 1971, was pâté baked in pastry, duck with olives, a salad and an almond tart, served......

Jeff Bezos Gifts Historic $200 Million to the Smithsonian

Smithsonian
In 1826, the British scientist James Smithson wrote an unusual will designating the United States as the recipient of a considerable fortune: a gift of $508,318 “to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge.” That bequest, worth about......

The Many Myths of the Term ‘Anglo-Saxon’

Smithsonian
People in the United States and Great Britain have long drawn on imagined Anglo-Saxon heritage as an exemplar of European whiteness. Before becoming president, Teddy Roosevelt led his “Rough Riders” on the 1898 U.S. invasion of Cuba with a copy of Edmond Demolins’ racist manifesto Anglo-Saxon Superiority in tow. In......

When Tuberculosis Patients Quarantined Inside Kentucky’s Mammoth Cave

Smithsonian
During the latter half of 1842, pale figures walked the shadows of Mammoth Cave, the world’s longest-known cave system, near central Kentucky—hospital gowns clung to their withering frames. The ghastly figures appeared as phantoms, but these were living, breathing people, though barely—their lungs had been ravaged by pulmonary consumption, later......

Cooking Up History with the National Museum of American History and Smithsonian Associates

Smithsonian
Smithsonian Voices Smithsonian Associates Cooking Up History with the National Museum of American History and Smithsonian Associates July 7th, 2021, 1:36PM / BY Lauren Lyons Cooking Up History, presented by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and Smithsonian Associates, shares fresh insights into American culture past and present through......

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