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Break’n News History Page. As an aggregate, blog and our own news, Break’n News presents information in photos, videos, and written.

History

In 1851, a Maryland Farmer Tried to Kidnap Free Blacks in Pennsylvania. He Wasn’t Expecting the Neighborhood to Fight Back | History

Smithsonian
The muse for this story is a humble piece of stone, no more than an inch square. Sometime in the mid-19th century, it had been fashioned into a gunflint—an object that, when triggered to strike a piece of steel, could spark a small explosion of black powder and propel a......
History

The American Scion Who Secured British Neutrality in the U.S. Civil War | History

Smithsonian
What do you wear to meet the queen of England? Torn between a crisp navy-and-gold lace suit or a severe black morning coat, Charles Francis Adams fretted over his first day of work. He was more comfortable in plain clothes, but worried that he would look like a proper English......
History

How Manhattan’s Diamond District Continues To Operate Like an Old World Bazaar | Travel

Smithsonian
In “Uncut Gems,” an overleveraged diamond jeweler named Howard Ratner, played by Adam Sandler, frantically tries to cover his bad business bets by making bigger ones. The film brilliantly captures the manic energy of New York City’s Diamond District, a bustling commercial stretch on Manhattan’s 47th Street between Fifth and......
History

Welcome Jason Reynolds, 2020-2021 National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature!

Library Of Congress
The following guest post is by Sasha Dowdy, program specialist in the Library’s Young Readers Center. Jason Reynolds, 2020-2021 National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature. Photo: James J. Reddington. You may have seen this exciting news from the Library: Young adult and middle grade author Jason Reynolds has been announced......
History

To Craft Cutting Tools, Neanderthals Dove for Clam Shells on the Ocean Floor | Science

Smithsonian
Archaeological evidence has upended our image of Neanderthals in the last couple of decades. We’ve learned that these extinct human relatives may have decorated their bodies, buried their dead and even created art. These behaviors make them seem much more like our own species, Homo sapiens, than previously believed. And......
History

How the Government Came To Decide the Color of Your Food | Innovation

Smithsonian
Tomatoes are red, margarine is yellow, and oranges, are, well, orange. We expect certain foods to be in certain colors. What we don’t realize is that these colors are not necessarily a product of nature but rather of historical controversies and deliberate decisions by various actors—including the government. The story......
History

Poetry Resolutions | From the Catbird Seat: Poetry & Literature at the Library of Congress

Library Of Congress
The following guest post, part of our “Teacher’s Corner” series, is by Rebecca Newland, a Fairfax County Public Schools Librarian and former Teacher in Residence at the Library of Congress. Happy New Year. New York : Currier & Ives, c1876. No matter how much poetry reading and writing you have......
History

How the Heroes of Africa Triumphed Against All Odds | At the Smithsonian

Smithsonian
He stands more than seven feet tall, with piercing eyes that seem almost alive, staring through the souls of entranced visitors into the future. The statue, Toussant Louverture et la vielle esclave (Toussant Louverture and the Elderly Slave), commands the room, sending out a powerful vibe that is tangible and......
History

How Haiti’s Devastating Earthquake Prompted a Worldwide Effort to Safeguard Cultural Heritage | At the Smithsonian

Smithsonian
SMITHSONIANMAG.COM | Jan. 10, 2020, 2:56 p.m. This month marks the ten-year anniversary of the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that devastated Haiti. The epicenter was near the nation’s capital, Port-au-Prince, home to 3 million. The January 12 quake wreaked havoc, becoming one of the largest natural disasters in human history. The......
History

These Photos Capture the World’s Sewer Systems When They Were Brand New | Innovation

Smithsonian
Below our city streets lies an ad-hoc world of subterranean tunnels and pipes. The oldest are brick and concrete sewers that once carried waste streams in one direction, rainfall overflow in another. Today, these waterways must contend with newer sewers, subway tunnels, power lines, and fiber-optic cables. But in the......
History

In the 1980s, a Far-Left, Female-Led Domestic Terrorism Group Bombed the U.S. Capitol | History

Smithsonian
Amidst the social and political turmoil of the 1970s, a handful of women—among them a onetime Barnard student, a Texas sorority sister, the daughter of a former communist journalist—joined and became leaders of the May 19th Communist Organization. Named to honor the shared birthday of civil rights icorn Malcolm X......
History

Hattie Caraway, the First Woman Elected to the U.S. Senate, Faced a Familiar Struggle With Gender Politics | History

Smithsonian
The first woman elected to the United States Senate is not a household name. That woman, Hattie Wyatt Caraway of Arkansas, kept a very low profile. She is not considered a political trailblazer. Indeed, she voted with the rest of the Southern delegation against the Anti-Lynching Bill of 1934, intended......
History

Ten Things We’ve Learned About Britain’s Monarchs in the Past Ten Years | History

Smithsonian
In recent years, the British royal family has filled the headlines as the Windsors hosted lavish weddings, welcomed petite princes and celebrated landmark milestones like Elizabeth II’s sapphire jubilee. But over the course of the 2010s, historians, archivists, archaeologists and other researchers gave the press, ever hungry for more monarchial......
History

Fifty Years Ago, the Murder of Jock Yablonski Shocked the Labor Movement | History

Smithsonian
On New Year’s Eve, 1969, Chip Yablonski called his father. Or at least, he tried to. “The phone didn’t answer,” Yablonski recalled nearly a half-century later. “We thought [he] went out for the evening.” Yablonski, at the time an attorney in Washington, D.C., didn’t think anything of it until a......

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