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August 2, 2021

Nazis

This Graphic Artist’s Olympic Pictograms Changed Urban Design Forever

Smithsonian
As the Olympic Games begin in Tokyo, participants face a familiar challenge. Athletes, officials and staff arriving from all over the world need to be able to find their way around without a common language. For decades, one solution to this problem has been pictograms, a spare visual language capable......

The ‘Protest’ Olympics That Never Came to Be

Smithsonian
In the very hot summer of 1936, a team of American Olympians crossed the Atlantic by ship, reaching Scotland on July 13. From there, they traveled to Paris, where they boarded another train, finally arriving at their destination a few days before the games were scheduled to start. They explored......

Women Resistance Fighters of WWII, the Secret Lives of Ants and Other New Books to Read

Smithsonian
When Germany invaded Poland in September 1939, sparking the beginning of World War II, the leaders of a Warsaw-based chapter of the Zionist HeHalutz youth movement instructed its members to retreat east. Initially, Frumka Płotnicka, a 25-year-old Jewish woman from the Polish city of Pinsk, complied with this request. But......

How the 1943 Khatyn Massacre Became a Symbol of Nazi Atrocities on the Eastern Front

Smithsonian
SMITHSONIANMAG.COM | March 22, 2021, 5 a.m. Viktor Andreevich Zhelobkovich was 8 years old at the time. He’d recall decades later that the invading Nazi troops and their collaborators forced him, his mother and the other residents of Khatyn, a tiny village in Belarus, to wait in a barn for......

Leftists have no right to censure Nazi analogies after four years of making them

NYPost
Josh Hammer Carano’s tale, in isolation, would be amusing but hardly newsworthy. What makes this story affirmatively galling is how it yet again evinces an ever-widening chasm between ruling-class elites and the dissident “deplorables” over whom they deign to rule. Source – For more click here To Return to the......

The Extraordinary Disappearing Act of a Novelist Banned by the Nazis

Smithsonian
The greatest trick that Irmgard Keun ever played was convincing the world she didn’t exist. Once an acclaimed German novelist, the then 31-year-old Keun had been living the life of an exile in either France or the Netherlands since 1936. Three years earlier the Nazis had condemned her enormously popular......

When Radio Stations Stopped a Public Figure From Spreading Dangerous Lies

Smithsonian
In speeches filled with hatred and falsehoods, a public figure attacks his enemies and calls for marches on Washington. Then, after one particularly virulent address, private media companies close down his channels of communication, prompting consternation from his supporters and calls for a code of conduct to filter out violent......

See 12 Stunning Portraits of World War II Veterans

Smithsonian
SMITHSONIANMAG.COM | Aug. 31, 2020, 9:55 a.m. Growing up, Zach Coco’s hero was his grandfather Anthony, a veteran who served in World War II’s Pacific theater as a sailor aboard the U.S.S. Rushmore. Though the Los Angeles-based photographer had always wanted to interview his grandfather about his wartime experiences, Anthony......

When Senator Joe McCarthy Defended Nazis

Smithsonian
Annihilate the enemy. That was Adolf Hitler’s standing order to his elite Waffen-SS as the Wehrmacht sought to break the Allies’ tightening grip in late 1944 by crashing through enemy lines in an audacious counteroffensive that would become known as the Battle of the Bulge. The Führer’s edict was enforced......

The True Story Behind the ‘Greyhound’ Movie

Smithsonian
SMITHSONIANMAG.COM | June 11, 2020, 11:20 a.m. Despite the fact that it was the longest military campaign of World War II, the Battle of the Atlantic—a six-year fight for control of the eponymous ocean—is often overshadowed by other clashes in the European and Pacific theaters. “It’s not the most glamorous......

When the RAF Buzzed Over Germany to Drown Out Nazi Broadcasts

Smithsonian
Germany decreed January 30, 1943 —the ten-year anniversary of Adolf Hitler’s rise to power—as a day of celebration. Berlin would host rallies, and Reich Marshal Hermann Goering’s address from the Air Ministry building would be broadcast throughout the Third Reich. Elements of Britain’s Royal Air Force would also be in......

Experience 1930s Europe Through the Words of Two African American Women | History

Smithsonian
Five years before the publication of the first Negro Motorist Green Book—the beloved guide of destinations deemed safe for African Americans in a nation segregated by Jim Crow—two cousins named Roberta G. Thomas and Flaurience Sengstacke chronicled what life was like for two young, African American women traveling abroad. Published......

Why the Experimental Nazi Aircraft Known as the Horten Never Took Off | At the Smithsonian

Smithsonian
In the years after World War I, when aviation was all the rage in Europe and North America but the Treaty of Versailles banned the production of military aircraft in Germany, glider clubs sprang up across the country. The brothers Walter and Reimar Horten, just 13 and 10 years old,......

The Sinking of the Wilhelm Gustloff | History

Smithsonian
By the time the Soviet Union advanced on Germany’s eastern front in January of 1945, it was clear the advantage in World War II was with the Allies. The fall of the Third Reich was by this point inevitable; Berlin would succumb within months. Among the German populace, stories of......

What Happened After the Liberation of Auschwitz | History

Smithsonian
It was January 1945, and fires burned at Auschwitz-Birkenau. Not at the crematoria where, at the height of the Nazi concentration and extermination camp’s operations, an average of 6,000 Jews were gassed and cremated each day—those had been blown up at the command of SS officers preparing the camps’ evacuation.......

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